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About

This blog is intended to equip subscribers and readers with the language, values, and tools to evoke new approaches to democracy and community governance. Evoke BC is a think tank: a research institute to explore new, innovative, and effective decision-making practices.

Central questions we'll explore here include:
  • How do our communities make decisions?
  • How should our communities make decisions? 
  • What will democracy look like in 50 years? In 100 years? 
Evoke BC is a group of people dedicated to sharing, exploring and supporting new approaches to democratic decision-making.

New concepts, ideas, and practices will be posted every two weeks - so check back often for the latest in community based democracy! 

Mark Friesen has a Master of Urban Studies degree from Simon Fraser University where he focused on governance and decision-making at the municipal scale. Mark works with nonprofit organizations in the design and implementation of stakeholder consultation projects, strategic planning engagements, organizational capacity assessments, and effective governance structures. He has a deep understanding and passion for democratic decision-making.


Katelyn McDougall has several years experience working with with non-profits, community research, communications, policy and service development, and is currently pursuing a Masters of Urban Studies degree at Simon Fraser University. Her research focuses on transportation finance and decision making within an intergovernmental context, and she has a keen interest in regional governance. She also works as a policy, research and public engagement consultant with a knack for facilitating discussion.

For questions, feedback, comments, or to get involved email us:
evokebc@gmail.com

Twitter: @evokebc

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Freedom to do stuff vs. freedom from stuff

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