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Evoke BC?

Evoke? Evoke what exactly?

Good question. Evoke BC is a group of people dedicated to sharing and exploring new
practices, approaches, and institutions for democratic decision making.

What does that mean? Think of people working together on a board or committee to run a farmer's market. Think of citizen assemblies. Think of community forums or participatory budgeting. Think of a group of neighbours organizing a block party.

Community governance. Community decision-making. Empowered political citizens from all walks of life. Collaborative governance.

Currently, our democratic institutions are centred around: 1) voting, 2) elected representatives. But democracy can happen in so many different ways. The Evoke research effort is focused on exploring and sharing different and alternative democratic practices that can deepen our civic engagement, and improve community decision-making.

Think Peace of Westphalia, Magna Carta, United Nations, colonialism...all of which shaped our communities, and how they are organized, in big ways. What's next? What's the next big shift in how we make decisions about our communities?

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